Capitol riot 'shaman' pleads mental instability

The man who wore a horned headdress to the Capitol riots has entered a mental instability claim as part of an attempt at a plea bargain.

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Jacob Anthony Chansley, also known as Jake Angeli
Jacob Anthony Chansley, also known as Jake Angeli
REUTERS/Stephanie Keith/File Photo

Reuters reports that the man who wore a furred and horned headdress to the Capitol riots, nicknamed the 'QAnon Shaman' by the internet, has entered a mental illness plea as part of a deal with the prosecution. According to his attorney, a prison psychologist has found Mr. Jacob Anthony Chansley of Arizona to suffer from transient schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety. Chansley's attorney has asserted that these conditions are a result of time spent in solitary confinement and has claimed that his service records from the U. S. Navy indicate the disorders were diagnosed some time ago.

Chansley joined the Capitol riots in his distinct garb, sporting both face paint and tattoos, and declared support for Donald Trump, and read a scathing denunciation of the Democratic party to the crowd, rapidly becoming one of the best-photographed individuals in the incident. He is one of 535 defendants so far charged in connection with the riot.

According to Reuters, the judge in his case has ordered a competency test to determine whether or not Chansley is fit to stand trial, one of 188 individuals charged whose mental competency is in doubt. Should he be found mentally incompetent, he will not be tried as a criminal, but the law will nevertheless require him to be incarcerated pending 'competency restoration treatment' in a federal prison hospital. With only three facilities available to provide that treatment in the United States, the average wait time to begin treatment for a male patient is approximately eighty-four days.

Mental health concerns in these have been exacerbated by the outbreak of COVID-19, which has forced many inmates into isolation for far longer than they would normally be allowed to go with no human contact.

The prosecution has declined to comment on the case.



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