Chief Rabbi Lau opposes kashrut reforms

Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi writes to Religious Affairs Minister: 'Those behind reforms are the ones who try to destroy State's Jewish character.'

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Rabbi David Lau and Matan Kahana
Rabbi David Lau and Matan Kahana
צילום: יונתן זינדל, פלאש 90

Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi David Lau sent a letter to Religious Affairs Minister Matan Kahana Wednesday expressing his opposition to the planned reforms in the kashrut industry, Channel 12 News reported.

"The bodies that initiated this outline have been trying for years to damage the Jewish status of the State of Israel, and concentrate most of their activities against the Chief Rabbinate," Rabbi Lau wrote. "It is very worthwhile to check once and for all who is behind the financing of this activity. It is a pity that the Religious Affairs Minister serves as an instrument in their hands for irreversible destruction."

Unlike the Sephardic Chief Rabbi, who refused to meet with Kahana, Rabbi Lau met with him but sent him a detailed letter of opposition. Rabbi Lau criticized the minister and called on him not to ignore the conclusions of the professional committee which dealt with the issue in depth.

"Those who are behind the move are the same bodies that have been carrying this flag for a long time. The shouts of joy that are heard from a particular camp testify to this more than anything. Are you part of them? This wave of legislation is meant to destroy the kashrut system in Israel and erase it." In his letter, Rabbi Lau called for cooperation with those in the rabbinate who are proficient in the field, and claimed that "complete disregard for their opinions is a serious mistake that must be taken into account."

Later, Rabbi Lau claimed that the goal increasing competition in the kashrut industry is puzzling, since such a goal is not sought after in other industries in Israel. "Will we also do this with other areas in the country such as building permits, licenses to start a business and the like? "Why can't a Jerusalem resident get a balcony permit from a city engineer on the other side of the country?" he wrote.



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