Yifat Shasha-Biton: 'Vaccination in schools? That's a crime'

Education Min. Shasha-Biton refuses to hear of vaccination in schools, says children are under 'emotional stress' from being at home.

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Yifat Shasha-Biton
Yifat Shasha-Biton
Gili Yaari/Flash90

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett spoke this week with Education Minister Yifat Shasha-Biton (New Hope) about her recent attack on various Health Ministry officials, including Head of Public Health Services Dr. Sharon Alroy-Preis, News 12 reported.

According to the report, Bennett called Shasha-Biton for a meeting and told her: "It's enough with speaking this way to the Health Ministry and professionals."

Shasha-Biton responded, "With all due respect, I have my own opinion."

She denied this in an interview, saying, "In my feeling, we live in two parallel worlds. The description of the conversation with the Prime Minister breaks records. This is a conversation that never happened. There are transcriptions of what never was. What was presented here did not happen."

According to her, the report is simply political spins from the opposition. "I saw the report that Prime Minister Bennett doesn't know how to run a government, and that I am a coronavirus denier. It seems to me more like briefings form the opposition. It's a discourse that I hear mostly from opposition MKs - and I don't hear it from my friends. We work together."

On the question of whether students will be able to receive the coronavirus vaccine in schools, Shasha-Biton said: "We're 35 days before the beginning of the school year - vaccinate. Is someone making it difficult to vaccinate and to create an educational campaign and encourage vaccination? The strategy of vaccines is one strategy, and where to vaccinate is another strategy. If we are in an emergency situation now - then act now."

"To do it in school - that's a crime, from my perspective. We're talking about children who for a year and a half sat at home, and they are under emotional stress. This is a very sensitive conversation, and it's about excommunicating and pressuring the children. We are placing the children in an impossible situation. With all of our will to beat the plague, and we know that the vaccine is effective and efficient and that it's important that it happen, we need to see how we'll do it in the right way."

Currently, the six-year-old and eight-year-old booster shots of MMRV and DTaP are provided in school settings, and the annual influenza vaccine is also sometimes provided in school, as is the HPV vaccine Parents send in a signed consent form and their child's vaccination records if they wish their children to receive the vaccine during school hours.



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